Archive for February, 2009

What do you know about Iran?!!

What do you know about Iran? What is your source of information? Are you one of those people who think Iran is a desert, where people use camel for transportation?! Or that Iran streets are dangerous for walking around since somebody might shoot you?
Anyway, if you’ve not visited Iran, and you are interested to know more about it, I suggest you to read this article:
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/travel/destinations/middle_east/article5768065.ece
The comments are interesting too!

I had heard that many foreigners (specially western citizens) have a wrong vision about Iran based on what they are fed by their media, and many of them are scared about traveling to Iran. Last year, in IranOpen 2008 RoboCup competitions, I met some foreigners there and talked with some of them. They told me the same thing! Some of them were really scared, and it was just after asking from many people who have visited Iran that they have decided to come to Iran. Even with this information, it was after coming to Iran that they forgot all of their scares!

***

Hopefully, I’ll see some of my foreign friends in IranOpen 2009 too! 🙂 I really like to see them again. It seems that some of them (from Netherlands and China for example) are planning to come again!

Using Fedora DVD; not a solution, but a bit better!

As I said before, the current state of Fedora package management in regard to using its installation media is so undesirable. Sooner or later, every new Fedora user will ask you about it except if it doesn’t want to use the media at all!
Interestingly, he can’t find any guides in his DVD about installing software from DVD after Fedora installation. Also, there is nothing in the official Fedora pages (at fedoraproject.org) as far as I know! Certainly, you can find about it in many places, but such basic guide should be in a more accessible place. (?!)
Anyway, just to make it a little easier for new users, I decided to create a small RPM package containing the required yum configuration file. At least I have a better answer for new users on phone! You can find the RPM package here: http://hedayat.fedorapeople.org/dvdrepo/fedora-dvd-repo-0.1-1.fc10.noarch.rpm
This RPM should work on Fedora 9, 10, and later for users which use Fedora DVD. It might work on other versions too!
No configuration should be needed, just install the package and run yum or Add/Remove Software.
Maybe someone liked to use it!

Have fun
🙂
Update: This RPM package works on Fedora 11 and should work on Fedora 12 and later. If it didn’t, please let me know so I’ll provide an updated RPM for that.

It would be nice if… (Fedora package management)

This is a long time (Since Fedora Core 4 if I remember correctly! (When Fedora started using yum)) that Fedora package management have some persistent small problems, that has a HUGE effect on an end users feeling. The simplest case and the most important thing is support for installation media by Fedora package manager.

Fedora uses internet repositories by default. That’s certainly not a problem for users with daily access to broadband internet connection. But what about a user without such an internet connection?! (Lots of users in my country!)

A new Linux user installs Fedora. Then, he decides to see what other packages are available in Fedora DVD (or its CD sets). He finds Add/Remove Software in the menus and runs it… But he finds out that he cannot use it at all to browse available packages and install them. IMHO, that’s too bad for a distribution to not recognize its installation media by default. A user without any network connection should be able to use its distributions installation media out of the box. And also, the package manager should not tell you that you cannot install ANY packages without a network connection! Certainly, installing a package from installation media doesn’t need any network connection!!

Yes, that’s true that you can add your Fedora DVD as a repository to yum (which cannot be done with GUI currently! But even if it was possible, it was still too much if you were required to type the URL yourself), but that’s not desirable at all. It must work by default, or at most by enabling an option in an accessible GUI.

This reason is enough for me to not insist on using Fedora for new users, the above reason is enough for them to have a dark image about Fedora!
While such an important problem exists, I won’t talk about not having any indication of the remaining download size in PackageKit… 😦